A Bunch of Ways You Can Play Doom Without the Need of a Bethesda.net Account

A few weeks ago, Bethesda surprised us all by releasing Doom, Doom 2, and Doom 3 on all modern platforms, Switch included. Releasing all of those games on Nintendo’s system was, without a doubt, the most exciting part of this news. Being able to play classic Doom on a portable is always a good prospect.

However, after downloading the games, we were faced with the obligation of having to create a Bethesda.net account in order to access them. That’s right, a mandatory online activation in order to play a game released in 1993. To make matters worse, thanks to these online check issues, the game will freeze whenever you put the Switch on sleep mode. Bethesda has stated that these mandatory online requirements weren’t part of the plan, and that they will patch these issues soon, but it’s safe to say that the damage has already been done. This isn’t the best way to play Doom.

That made me wonder of all the other ways we can play Doom without the need of registering to a Bethesda.net account. I decided to list all of the ways I could find, but considering this is Doom, I’m sure I’m forgetting a lot of them. Here we go!

 

The original version on PC, which can be bought on Steam

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It’s cheap, it runs flawlessly, it can be played on literally any computer released after 1995, it can be modded, and it doesn’t require a Bethesda.net account.

 

The SNES version

You can play the original Doom on the Super Nintendo thanks to the power of the Super FX chip. You don’t need a Bethesda.net account to play this version.

 

The Sega 32X version

Without a doubt, the worst sounding version of them all. With that being said, it featured a better framerate and resolution than the SNES version. The con: you needed a 32X to play it. The pro: you don’t need a Bethesda.net account.

 

The Atari Jaguar version

While the 32X version had a terrible soundtrack, the Jaguar version had no soundtrack at all, but compensated by having a great overall performance, as it was ported by John Carmack himself. Sure, you’d still need a freaking Jaguar in order to play it, but be grateful that the Jaguar didn’t have internet access, so no Bethesda.net account is required in order to play it.

 

The 3DO version

Simply put, the 3DO version is not good at all, but the fact it was coded in a few weeks by a single person is impressive. That was the first version of Doom I have ever played, and even though it sucks, I have fond memories of it. It also didn’t force me to create a Bethesda.net account.

 

The PlayStation version

The PS1 version of Doom, which doesn’t require a Bethesda.net account, might lack the original soundtrack, but looks great and plays like a dream. It was considered the best version of Doom on a console up until the release of the Xbox 360 version.¬†

 

The Sega Saturn version

It’s widely considered the worst official version of Doom ever made due to its terrible visuals, framerate, and lack of a metal soundtrack, but I can’t hate it that much. I mean, it doesn’t require a Bethesda.net account in order to be played.

 

The Game Boy Advance version

The OG portable Doom! The first time we were able to play a proper iteration of Doom on a portable device, even if the the controls were weird and the soundtrack was downright abysmal. This is the only version of Doom on a Nintendo handheld that doesn’t require a Bethesda.net account, so don’t think it’s all but useless nowadays!

 

The Xbox version included in Doom 3

The original Doom was available as a bonus feature on the Xbox version of Doom 3. Remember when entire games were added solely as bonus content inside other games? And without forcing you to log in with your Bethesda.net account in order to access all of its features?

 

The Xbox Live Arcade version

You could redeem this game from the special edition of Doom 3 for the Xbox 360 or download it as a separate XBLA game. This is the best version of Doom ever released in my opinion. It can even run on the Xbox One, without the need of creating a Bethesda.net account, may I add.

 

The PS3 version included in Doom 3

It’s not as easily accessible as the Xbox 360 version, but hey, it runs perfectly and it doesn’t require a Bethesda.net account.

 

The Tapwave Zodiac version

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I knew nothing about the Tapwave Zodiac prior to writing this article, but it seems like a device that acts both as a PDA and a portable gaming system. Somehow, Id Software decided to port Doom, as well as Doom 2, to this unknown device. It has a somewhat large screen and it doesn’t require a Bethesda.net account, so I can assume that this isn’t the worst port of Doom out there.

 

The homebrew version on a 128KB ZX Spectrum

Yep, you can play Doom on a computer with 128 kilobytes of RAM. It might not have the classic soundtrack we all love, but this is probably the only version of Doom that you can dance to. You don’t need a Bethesda.net account to play it, by the way.

 

Doom on an Apple Watch

You can’t get more portable than this, and you won’t even need a Bethesda.net account in order to play it.

 

Doom on an old-school iPod

I don’t even know how the controls work in this version, but any version that doesn’t require a Bethesda.net account is fair game for me.

 

Doom on a Kodak camera

This Kodak camera from 1998 can run Doom without the need of a Bethesda.net account. It’s a win-win.

 

Doom in a Honda Fit

That works for any car that features an HDMI port. The trick is to connect a Raspberry Pi on both the USB port and the HDMI port, and voilà, you can play Doom in a car, with control support and all, as well as no Bethesda.net account requirements.

 

Doom running on a thermostat

I’m lost for words. You can play Doom on a thermostat with controller support and all. You won’t even need to create a Bethesda.net account in order to enjoy this technological masterpiece.

 

Doom on an ultrasound machine

Just picture the following: you arrive with your pregnant wife to do an ultrasound check and the doctor is busy playing E1M1 on the ultrasound machine. At the very least, I doubt he had to create a Bethesda.net account in order to play it.

 

Doom on the Zune

Remember the Zune? Microsoft’s failed attempt to grab a chunk of the iPod’s market share? Well, you can actually play Doom on one of those. It might not run flawlessly, but hey, it’s a portable version of Doom that doesn’t require a Bethesda.net account.

 

Doom on a printer

I have no idea why anyone would try to play Doom this way, but hey, you still don’t need a Bethesda.net account to play it.

 

Doom on a TomTom GPS

That will make your long trips to the countryside a lot less boring, and you won’t even need to create a Bethesda.net account in order to enjoy it.

 

Doom on an ATM machine

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You can play Doom on the same machine that gives you money. The best part, it doesn’t require a Bethesda.net account for you to access its content. Just your bank account password.

 

Doom on the Ouya

Well, given how the Ouya is basically an Android-powered mini-console that can be easily hacked, it’s safe to say that Doom can played on it. I really doubt you’d need a Bethesda.net account to play it, so that’s a plus.

 

Did we miss any other ways you can play Doom without a Bethesda.net account? Let us know in the comment section below!

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